Common issues picked up by ICB Assessors

The following topics are commonly identified by ICB’s assessors during marking, and students who fall into these categories (regardless of whether accidentally or not) may find themselves disqualified or facing disciplinary action.

Incorrect exam written

The first irregularity which could be easily avoided, is students writing the incorrect exam. This occurs in the form of students writing the incorrect subject, as well as students writing the correct subject, but for the incorrect date (i.e. writing the Monday exam on the Saturday). This is very problematic because not only will the student be disqualified, the following exam will also be compromised, affecting other students as well. Providers are urged to please ensure that students are given the correct exams on the correct days, a this issue is disadvantaging students unnecessarily.

Plagiarism

ICB Assessors often identify students who submit very similar work with no citations, this is unacceptable and is considered an offence. Students found guilty of this could have their work rejected as null and avoid or face other disciplinary action.

Students must be made aware that any assistance that contributed to the production of their work should be acknowledged through citations and indentation, including help from fellow students and any other sources. The reader should always know which part of the work is based on independent thoughts or research and which part isn’t.

Plagiarism may be described as written falsification or representing another person’s work or thoughts as your own, with or without their approval or by combining their work with your work without acknowledgement. Plagiarism may also be deliberate or accidental. Regardless of the circumstances, under exam regulations deliberate or accidental plagiarism is an offence.

Suspected cheating

Another issue flagged by assessors is suspected cheating. Students suspected of cheating are closely monitored in future exams. Mechanisms such as our seating plans have been put in place to manage issues such as cheating and providers are asked to adhere to these guidelines to assist ICB assessors in identifying cheating students.

Caught cheating

The fourth most common issue identified by ICB assessors is students caught cheating. The ramifications of this are huge because not only are students disqualified, the integrity of ICB courses are also compromised. Providers are asked to remain vigilant during exam proceedings to ensure that students marks are indeed a reflection of their competence, and to notify the ICB of students cheating so that the relevant procedures can be followed.